Three new guests!

In the past week we welcomed three new guests in The Hague. They made a description about their projects, so feel free to say hi to them if there's anything in there that has your interest!

Abe and Irina:

“While at DCR, our intention is to combine our 30,000+ photos, 60+ hours of audio and dozens of blog posts and unpublished writings from the US and Belarus into a graphic novel that we hope to publish and tour with in the US and Europe upon completion.

We would love introductions to contemporary artists, writers and human rights activists in The Hague. As this is our first book, anyone who can give us advice on the publication process would also be great to meet. Likewise, we look forward to meeting, collaborating and sharing meals with you and the other artists at DCR.

Our website at openfeast.org contains much more content relating to our current project.
Our goal for this residency is to take these relatively raw materials (along with hours of recorded audio from dozens of events across the United States) and refine them into a graphic novel.”




Leigh Suh:

"I am interested in the concept of transformation. How different elements encounter and react with each other. And my most recent work focusses on the point where the act of repetitive painting creates sculpture, culminating in artistic transformation. Other influencing interests include process art, installation art, Si-fi movies, architecture, and the use of space. The materials I use are also influential in my work. Materials that are easily susceptible to change and manipulation; such as rubber, silicon, latex and paper. The works of Angela de la Cruz, Phillyda Barlow and Gabriel Orozco have stimulated the development of my ideas.
My proposed work at The Hauge will look at the interaction between memory and space. The main project I am thinking of doing is a space casting. During my stay in the residency, I will sleep, eat, create work, talk, think and interact in the studio space. The room will be covered in traces of my existence over my 6 week residency, before I return to my life in London. If I were to cast the entire living and work space and take it back with me, would I have a physical representation of the memories created during this time too? This is what I will attempt to achieve.
That said, I prefer not to make a clear declaration of what I am looking for. I am open to the stories that The Hague will offer, and I will embrace uncertainty. The main reason I decided to go to The Hague was so that I could work in a diff erent environment, listen to different stories, and not know the answer to the question: What could happen next?"